South China Sea: Does ChinaHave a Superior Claim? (Biển Đông: Trung Quốc có lợi thế hơn trong tuyên bố chủ quyền?)

scribd – August 5, 2012

Carlyle A. Thayer

Sourabh Gupta has written an article entitled, “China’s South China Sea jurisdictionalclaims: when politics and law collide” on the East Asia Forum, July 29, 2012. This isattached below. In this article he asserted:

China’s claim to the primary land elements lying within the nine-dashed line theSpratlys and the Paracels is markedly superior to those of its rival claimants.Alone among claimants, China is capable of coupling ‘continuous and effectiveoccupation’ of the islands, islets and reefs with a robust modern international law-based claim backed by relevant multilateral and bilateral instruments.

I posted the following reply:

I would like to ask Sourabh Gupta if I have got his argument right. China has asuperior claim to the features in the South China Sea because: (a) a series of Han/Mongol/Manchu dynasties produced maps incorporating them into their sphereof control; but by and large the vast majority of features were unoccupied andunadministered; (b) the Republic of China carried on this tradition and occupiedsome of the islets in the Paracel Islands and Taiping Island and perhaps nearbyfeatures in the Spratly Islands; (c) France occupied and took possession of manyfeatures in the South China Sea claimed by the Republic China; (d) everyone lost outwhen Japan swept through the region during the Second World War and (3) Japanrenounced it territorial claims in the South China Sea under the 1951 San FranciscoPeace Treaty.

Questions: didn’t the features previously held by France return to French jurisdiction at that time? If Japan renounced territorial claims in 1951, what the heck is it doing a year later renouncing “all right, title and claim to the Spratly and Paracel Islands to the Republic of China” in a treaty with Taiwan? Didn’t the states of Vietnam (Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the State of Vietnam) acquire French-heldterritory when France departed the scene in 1954-55? Why should Vietnam or thePhilippines have sought a cession or reversion clause from Japan?I think it is a bit of an overstatement to argue that China has a superior claim to allthe islands, islets and features in the South China Sea. China may have a better claimto some islands and features. But to argue it can demonstrate continuousoccupation and administration over each and every feature that is today above water at high tide has yet to be demonstrated. How did it come about that so manyof the features that were occupied in the 1990s were uninhabited?Finally, if the starting point is the pre-colonial era, can we really argue that China hasa superior claim to islands, islets and rocks that were also visited by Malay andVietnamese fishermen? Because there was no Philippines kingdom in the pre-colonial era, should we conclude that the written records of dynastic China trumphistoric native rights to traditional fishing grounds?

I think a good case can be made that China’s claims to continuous occupation andadministration are spurious with respect to the vast majority of the features that arepresently occupied by Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia. It might be further argued that in some residual cases China abandoned these features. The People’s Republic of China had to seize the western Paracels by force in 1974. The PRC wasnot physically present in the Spratly Islands until 1988 when it attacked and seizedJohnson South Reef. The next phase of Chinese expansion came in the early 1990swhen China and Vietnam scrambled to occupy as many of the features that wereabove high tide as possible.International law, in this case the United Nations Convention on Law of the Sea, hascontributed to making a resolution of contending territorial disputes more difficult.Sovereignty over territory confers sovereign rights over the resources in surroundingwater and sea bed. That is why China asserts indisputable sovereignty over the SouthChina Sea.

Suggested citation: Carlyle A. Thayer, “South China Sea: Does China Have a SuperiorClaim?,”

Thayer Consultancy Background Brief , August 5, 2012.Thayer Consultancy Background Briefs are archived and may be accessed at:http://www.scribd.com/carlthayer.

——

China’s South China Sea jurisdictional claims: when politics and law collide

East Asia Forum, July 29, 2012

Author: Sourabh Gupta, Samuels InternationalA running thread through the tensions at various Southeast Asian regional forumsover the past four summers has been the uncertainty and insecurity generated by China’s jurisdictional claims in the South China Sea.

Legally, China claims sovereignty over the disputed islands and adjacent waters inthe Sea and sovereign rights over relevant waters as well as the seabed and subsoil thereof – a claim in accordance with Law of the Seas (LOS) norms.

But operationally, China’s oceanic law enforcement agencies have unilaterally, andat times forcefully, enforced their writ across the more expansive political perimeterbounded by the ‘nine-dashed line’.

Plainly, these legal and political claims overlap but do not coincide. However, endlessdwelling on the supposedly impenetrable logic of the nine-dashed line’s extremity isside-tracking attention from what ought to be the central premise of this issue: thatChina’s claim to the primary land elements lying within the nine-dashed line-theSpratlys and the Paracels-is markedly superior to those of its rival claimants.

Alone among claimants, China is capable of coupling ‘continuous and effective occupation’ of the islands, islets and reefs with a robust modern international law-based claim backed by relevant multilateral and bilateral instruments.In 1952, Japan renounced all right, title and claim to the Spratly and Paracel Islandsto the Republic of China (Taiwan), by way of Article 2 of the bilateral Japan –Taiwan Treaty of Taipei. This treaty followed – and referenced—the territorialrenunciations of the Islands by Japan under the 1951 San Francisco Peace Treaty , which had not identified the beneficiary at the time—a treaty that was ratified byboth the Philippine and (South) Vietnamese governments. And although neithercountry is bound by provisions in the bilateral Japan –Taiwan treaty, neither canproduce a Spratlys/Paracels cession or reversion clause in their own bilateral treatieswith Japan. Rather, their claims are supplementarily based on historical cartography in the case of Vietnam or, for the Philippines, ‘historical discovery’ that is (incredibly) of a post-World War II vintage!At the end of the day, ultimate title cannot be said to rest with any one party so longas a territorial claim is not resolved by way of a binding instrument betweenclaimant states. At best, there are better claims and less-better claims to the territory in question. But given China’s law-based claim is superior to that of rivalclaimants, why does it persist with theinfamous nine-dashed line

[1] ?As the successor government of Taiwan, the mundane reason is that Beijing isproceeding from the claim line that it inherited from the Chiang Kai-shek regime asthe baseline for negotiation and compromise in an open territorial dispute. Beijing’s approach to negotiating its Himalayan boundary dispute with India is no different inthis regard. But the technical reason is more complicated. Were China to submit anLOS-compliant claim to its outer continental shelf limits in the South China Sea, the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS), tasked with examiningits validity, would almost certainly strike down parts of the submission.The CLCS appears on track to de-recognising Japan’s claim that the two high-tideelevations—totally the size of five tatami mats—within the Okinotori atolls in thePacific are in fact ‘islands’ capable of generating an EEZ (that is ironically larger indimension than the land mass of Japan itself). By the same reasoning, many of thehigh-tide elevations under Beijing’s control in the South China Sea would be found tobe mere ‘rocks’. Although CLCS findings are non-enforceable, it would dent China’scase to certain disputed resource-rich zones within the Sea—hence its preferencefor the nine-dashed line.The foremost motive for the nine-dashed line’s persistence is its intertwined character with the highly politicised, deterrence-based model of territorial disputemanagement that Beijing favours.Territorial jurisdiction issues have never been treated as mere cartographic detail:they are tied to a larger political calculus of stability and good neighbourliness. In itsmaritime dimension, joint development of commonly held resources has been theestablished mode to implement this principle. Here, Manila’s misjudgement in abrogating its joint seismic study agreement with Vietnam and China in 2008(compounding the error by unilaterally issuing exploration licenses within a disputedsection of the study area) has been the principal cause of the swift deterioration inbilateral ties with China.Furthermore, territorial settlements have never been concluded under duress, and China’s rulers calibrate their approach between a hard-line and a flexible one to suitthe strategic circumstances at hand. The nine-dashed line has conveniently served asa hard-line expedient that Beijing’s competing maritime bureaucracies are not shy tolever to signal displeasure to other claimants.So what are the enabling circumstances that would motivate China to set the nine-dashed line aside and adhere to best international practice in issuing forth maritime jurisdictional claims? Beijing has previously been willing to soften its inflated ‘naturalprolongation’ principle with Korea and Japan to pursue fisheries and (in-principle) joint resource development, and the 2000 Gulf of Tonkin maritime delimitationagreement with Vietnam too was firmly in keeping with the highest internationalpractices.Given the fast-paced development of international maritime law, which isaccentuating the gap between political calculus-based and rules-based orders at sea, it is in China’s self -interest to submit an LOS-compliant claim to its outer continental-shelf limits in the South China Sea. Beijing’s gains in goodwill earned will far outweigh the territory, and resources, relinquished. It might also allow China leewayto subsequently initiate a region-wide conversation on introducing limits toobjectionable, threat-based activities in EEZs by foreign navies, under the guise of navigational freedoms.

Sourabh Gupta is Senior Research Associate at Samuels International Associates, Washington DC, and a 2012 EAF Distinguished Fellow.

—–

http://www.scribd.com/doc/102133125/Thayer-South-China-Sea-Does-China-Have-a-Superior-Claim

—-

Bản dịch của: Dương Lệ Chi

Ông Sourabh Gupta đã viết một bài báo có tựa đề: “Tuyên bố chủ quyền tài phán trên biển Đông của Trung Quốc: khi chính trị và luật pháp xung đột“, đăng trên Diễn đàn Đông Á (East Asia Forum), ngày 29 tháng 7 năm 2012. Bài viết được đăng kèm bên dưới. Trong bài viết này, ông khẳng định:

Tuyên bố chủ quyền của Trung Quốc đối với các yếu tố đất đai chủ yếu, nằm trong đường chín đoạn đứt khúc – quần đảo Hoàng Sa và Trường Sa – rõ ràng là thuận lợi hơn so với các đối thủ đòi chủ quyền của họ.

Một mình trong các nước tranh chấp, Trung Quốc có khả năng nối kết chuyện ‘chiếm đóng liên tục và hiệu quả’ các hòn đảo, đảo nhỏ và rặng san hô ngầm, với tuyên bố dựa theo luật pháp quốc tế hiện đại, mạnh mẽ, được hỗ trợ bằng các công cụ song phương và đa phương có liên quan.

Tôi đã đăng phần trả lời sau đây:

Tôi muốn hỏi ông Sourabh Gupta, nếu như tôi hiểu đúng lập luận của ông. Trung Quốc có lợi thế hơn trong tuyên bố chủ quyền đối với các vùng đất, đảo, đá… (features) ở Biển Đông (nguyên văn: biển Hoa Nam) bởi vì: (a) các triều đại Hán/ Mông Cổ/ Mãn Châu đã làm ra các bản đồ, kết hợp chúng với khu vực mà họ kiểm soát, nhưng bằng cách và phần lớn các vùng đất, đảo, đá đó đều không có người ở và không ai quản lý; (b) Trung Hoa Dân Quốc (ND: tức Đài Loan) kế tục truyền thống này và chiếm đóng một số đảo nhỏ trong quần đảo Hoàng Sa và đảo Thái Bình, và có lẽ các vùng lân cận trong quần đảo Trường Sa (c) Pháp chiếm đóng và nắm quyền sở hữu nhiều vùng đất, đảo, đá ở biển Đông mà Đài Loan tuyên bố chủ quyền; (d) tất cả các nước đều bị mất quyền kiểm soát khi Nhật Bản tràn qua khu vực này trong chiến tranh thế giới thứ hai và (e) Nhật Bản từ bỏ chủ quyền lãnh thổ ở Biển Đông theo Hiệp ước Hòa bình San Francisco năm 1951.

Câu hỏi: Các vùng đất, đảo, đá… trước đây do người Pháp nắm giữ đã được trả lại quyền tài phán cho Pháp vào thời điểm đó phải không? Nếu Nhật từ bỏ các tuyên bố chủ quyền lãnh thổ năm 1951, vậy thì họ làm quái quỷ gì khi một năm sau đó [họ lại] từ bỏ “tất cả các quyền, giấy tờ xác nhận quyền sở hữu và việc đòi chủ quyền ở quần đảo Trường Sa và Hoàng Sa với Trung Hoa Dân Quốc” trong một hiệp ước với Đài Loan? Chẳng phải các chính phủ Việt Nam (Việt Nam Dân chủ Cộng hòa và Quốc Gia Việt Nam) có được lãnh thổ do Pháp nắm giữ khi Pháp rời khỏi khu vực năm 1954-1955? Vì sao Việt Nam hay Phillippines tìm kiếm sự nhượng lại hay điều khoản trao trả từ Nhật?

Tôi nghĩ rằng tuyên bố hơi quá lời một chút khi lập luận rằng Trung Quốc có lợi thế hơn trong tuyên bố chủ quyền đối với tất cả các đảo, đảo nhỏ và các vùng đất, đá ở Biển Đông. Có thể tuyên bố của Trung Quốc thuận lợi hơn đối với một số hòn đảo và đất đai, nhưng lập luận rằng họ có thể chứng minh sự chiếm hữu và quản lý liên tục đối với từng nơi và mỗi nơi hiện đang nằm trên mặt nước khi thủy triều lên cao, thì vẫn chưa chứng minh được. Làm gì có thể có chuyện rất nhiều vùng đã bị chiếm hữu trong thập niên 1990 là không có người ở?

Cuối cùng thì, nếu điểm khởi đầu là thời kỳ tiền thuộc địa, liệu chúng ta có thể lập luận rằng Trung Quốc có tuyên bố chủ quyền thuận lợi hơn đối với các đảo, đảo nhỏ và đá, [những nơi] cũng đã được các ngư dân Mã Lai và Việt Nam lui tới hay không? Bởi vì trong thời tiền thuộc địa không có vương quốc Philippines, vậy chúng ta có nên kết luận rằng các tài liệu đã được viết dưới thời các triều đại [phong kiến] Trung Quốc thì vượt trội hơn về các quyền tự nhiên lịch sử đối với các khu vực đánh cá truyền thống?

Tôi nghĩ chứng cớ rõ ràng là tuyên bố của Trung Quốc về việc chiếm đóng và cai quản liên tục là không xác thực đối với hầu hết các vùng đất, đảo, đá hiện do Việt Nam, Philippines và Malaysia chiếm giữ. Có thể lập luận thêm rằng trong một số trường hợp còn lại, Trung Quốc đã từ bỏ các vùng đất, đảo, đá này. Cộng hòa Nhân dân Trung Hoa đã chiếm phía Tây quần đảo Hoàng Sa bằng vũ lực hồi năm 1974. Cộng hòa Nhân dân Trung Hoa không hề có mặt trên thực tế ở quần đảo Trường Sa cho đến năm 1988 khi họ tấn công và chiếm Đá Gạc Ma (Johnson South Reef). Giai đoạn kế tiếp của sự bành trướng của Trung Quốc là đầu thập niên 1990 khi Trung Quốc và Việt Nam tranh nhau để chiếm càng nhiều càng tốt các vùng đất, đảo, đá nằm trên mặt nước khi thủy triều lên cao.

Luật pháp quốc tế, trong trường hợp này là Công ước Liên Hiệp Quốc về Luật Biển, đã góp phần làm cho một giải pháp về tranh đấu trong các chấp lãnh thổ khó khăn hơn. Chủ quyền lãnh thổ trao quyền chủ quyền về tài nguyên trong vùng biển xung quanh và đáy biển. Đó là lý do vì sao Trung Quốc khẳng định chủ quyền không thể tranh cãi trên Biển Đông.

Nguồn: Carlyle A. Thayer, “Biển Đông: Trung Quốc có lợi thế hơn trong tuyên bố chủ quyền?” Thayer Consultancy Background Brief, ngày 6 tháng 8 năm 2012.

———–

East Asia Forum

Tuyên bố chủ quyền tài phán trên biển Đông của Trung Quốc: khi chính trị và luật pháp xung đột

Tác giả: Sourabh Gupta – Samuels International

29-07-2012

Một chủ đề đã và đang được các nước bàn luận về những căng thẳng tại các diễn đàn khu vực Đông Nam Á khác nhau trong bốn mùa hè vừa qua thì trong tình trạng không rõ ràng và bấp bênh, được tạo ra bởi các tuyên bố về quyền tài phán của Trung Quốc trên biển Đông (nguyên văn: Biển Hoa Nam).

Về mặt pháp lý, Trung Quốc tuyên bố chủ quyền trên các đảo tranh chấp và vùng biển lân cận và các quyền chủ quyền trên vùng biển liên quan, cũng như dưới đáy biển và trong lòng đất ở đó – một yêu sách dựa theo các quy định về Luật Biển. Tuy nhiên, về mặt thi hành, các cơ quan thực thi luật biển của Trung Quốc đã đơn phương, và đôi khi một cách áp đặt, thi hành lệnh của họ trên vành đai chính trị mở rộng hơn, gắn với ‘đường chín đoạn đứt khúc’.

Rõ ràng, các tuyên bố về pháp lý và chính trị này chồng lên nhau nhưng không trùng khớp nhau. Tuy nhiên, nghĩ mãi về điều được cho là logic cốt lõi đằng sau đường chín đoạn đứt khúc là việc đánh lạc hướng sự chú ý đến điều phải là tiền đề trọng tâm của vấn đề này: Tuyên bố chủ quyền của Trung Quốc đối với các yếu tố đất đai chính, nằm trong đường chín đoạn đứt khúc – quần đảo Hoàng Sa và Trường Sa – rõ ràng là thuận lợi hơn so với các đối thủ đòi chủ quyền của họ.

Một mình trong các nước tranh chấp, Trung Quốc có khả năng nối kết chuyện ‘chiếm đóng liên tục và hiệu quả’ các hòn đảo, đảo nhỏ và rặng san hô ngầm, với tuyên bố dựa trên luật pháp quốc tế hiện đại, mạnh mẽ, được hỗ trợ bằng các công cụ song phương và đa phương có liên quan.

Năm 1952, Nhật Bản từ bỏ mọi quyền, từ bỏ giấy tờ xác nhận quyền sở hữu và từ bỏ tuyên bố chủ quyền trên các quần đảo Trường Sa và Hoàng Sa đối với Trung Hoa Dân Quốc (Đài Loan), theo Điều 2 của Hiệp ước Đài Bắc, một hiệp ước song phương giữa Nhật Bản – Đài Loan. Hiệp ước này theo sau – và đã nhắc đến – là sự từ bỏ [chủ quyền] lãnh thổ của Nhật Bản đối với các hòn đảo theo Hiệp ước Hòa bình San Francisco năm 1951, Hiệp ước đã không xác định nước thụ hưởng vào thời điểm đó – một hiệp ước đã được Philippines và Chính phủ (miền Nam) Việt Nam phê chuẩn. Và mặc dù cả hai nước không bị ràng buộc bởi các điều khoản trong hiệp ước song phương Nhật – Đài, nhưng không nước nào đưa ra sự nhượng lại hay điều khoản thu hồi quần đảo Trường Sa/ Hoàng Sa trong các hiệp ước song phương của họ với Nhật Bản. Thay vào đó, các tuyên bố phụ của họ dựa trên bản đồ lịch sử trong trường hợp Việt Nam, hay với Philippines là ‘khám phá lịch sử’ (khó tin) từ thời kỳ hậu Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ II!

Tóm lại, cuối cùng thì giấy tờ xác nhận chủ quyền không thể nói là nên trao cho bất kỳ nước nào, với điều kiện là tuyên bố lãnh thổ không được giải quyết bằng một công cụ ràng buộc giữa các nước tuyên bố chủ quyền. Tốt nhất, tuyên bố chủ quyền lãnh thổ của nước này có lý hơn hoặc ít thuyết phục hơn nước kia, đang được bàn đến. Nhưng với tuyên bố dựa trên luật pháp của Trung Quốc đã đưa ra thì vượt trội so với các tuyên bố chủ quyền của các đối thủ của họ, vì sao họ vẫn khăng khăng vớiđường chín đoạn đứt khúc đáng hổ thẹn [1]?

Khi chính phủ Đài Loan kế nhiệm, lý do quen thuộc là Bắc Kinh đang tiến hành đòi những phần mà họ thừa hưởng từ chế độ Tưởng Giới Thạch, như là chuẩn mực để đàm phán và thỏa hiệp trong một vụ tranh chấp lãnh thổ mở rộng. Phương pháp của Bắc Kinh trong đàm phán tranh chấp biên giới Hy Mã Lạp Sơn với Ấn Độ thì không khác nhau về mặt này. Nhưng lý do kỹ thuật thì phức tạp hơn. Trung Quốc có đệ trình tuyên bố chủ quyền tuân theo Luật Biển đối với các ranh giới bên ngoài thềm lục địa trên Biển Đông hay không, Ủy ban Ranh giới Thềm lục địa của Liên Hiệp Quốc (CLCS) kiểm tra tính hợp lệ của nó, gần như chắc chắn sẽ làm mất hiệu lực các phần trong nội dung đệ trình.

Ủy ban Ranh giới Thềm lục địa sẽ có mặt đúng lúc để không thừa nhận tuyên bố của Nhật về hai vùng [đảo đá] nằm trên mặt nước khi thủy triều dâng cao – kích thước tổng cộng bằng năm chiếc chiếu tatami – trên các đảo san hô Okinotori ở Thái Bình Dương là “các hòn đảo” có khả năng tạo ra vùng đặc quyền kinh tế (trớ trêu thay, nó lớn hơn toàn bộ đất đai của nước Nhật Bản). Cũng với lập luận tương tự, nhiều vùng [đảo đá] nằm trên mặt biển khi thủy triều dâng cao do Bắc Kinh kiểm soát trên Biển Đông, sẽ tìm thấy chỉ là ‘những hòn đá’. Mặc dù những phát hiện của Ủy ban Ranh giới Thềm lục địa thì không được thi hành, nhưng nó sẽ làm suy yếu trường hợp của Trung Quốc đối với một số khu vực đang tranh chấp giàu tài nguyên trên biển – do đó sự họ ưu tiên đường chín đoạn đứt khúc.

Động lực quan trọng nhất trong việc khăng khăng [đòi chủ quyền ở] đường chín đoạn đứt khúc là vấn đề đã bị chính trị hóa, mô hình quản lý tranh chấp lãnh thổ dựa trên sự ngăn chặn mà Bắc Kinh ưa chuộng

Các vấn đề về quyền tài phán lãnh thổ chưa bao giờ chỉ được xem là chi tiết trong bản đồ: chúng được gắn với sự toan tính chính trị lớn hơn về sự ổn định và láng giềng tốt. Trong khuôn khổ hàng hải, việc khai thác chung ở những khu vực có tài nguyên là phương thức đã được thiết lập để thi hành nguyên tắc này. Ở đây, tính toán sai lầm của Manila trong việc bãi bỏ thỏa thuận nghiên cứu địa chấn chung với Việt Nam và Trung Quốc trong năm 2008 (gom các sai lầm, đơn phương cấp giấy phép thăm dò trong vùng tranh chấp của khu vực nghiên cứu) là nguyên nhân chính gây ra sự suy thoái nhanh chóng trong quan hệ song phương với Trung Quốc.

Hơn nữa, việc giải quyết [tranh chấp] lãnh thổ chưa bao giờ được kết luận là do cưỡng ép, và những người cầm quyền Trung Quốc điều chỉnh phương pháp tiếp cận giữa một chính sách cứng rắn với một chính sách linh hoạt, thích hợp với tình huống chiến lược sắp tới. Đường chín đoạn đứt khúc thuận tiện trong việc phục vụ như là một chiến thuật cứng rắn mà những người quan liêu chạy đua trên biển của Bắc Kinh không dè dặt đưa ra để báo hiệu sự không hài lòng đối với các nước tuyên bố chủ quyền khác.

Vậy thì các tình huống có thể thúc đẩy Trung Quốc đặt đường chín đoạn đứt khúc qua một bên và tốt nhất tuân theo thông lệ quốc tế trong việc ban hành quy định về tuyên bố các quyền tài phán hàng hải sắp tới là gì? Trước đó, Bắc Kinh đã sẵn sàng nới lỏng nguyên tắc ‘mở rộng tự nhiên’ về mặt hình thức với Nam Hàn và Nhật Bản để theo đuổi nghề cá và (trên nguyên tắc) cùng hợp tác khai thác, và Hiệp định phân định Vịnh Bắc Bộ năm 2000 với Việt Nam cũng là để thi hành theo các thông lệ quốc tế cao nhất.

Với sự phát triển nhanh của luật hàng hải quốc tế [2], bộ luật nhấn mạnh khoảng cách giữa trật tự dựa trên toan tính chính trị và trật tự dựa theo luật lệ trên biển, quyền lợi của chính Trung Quốc là đệ trình tuyên bố tuân theo Luật Biển về các giới hạn bên ngoài thềm lục địa trên Biển Đông. Lợi ích mà Bắc Kinh thu được về thiện chí sẽ nhiều hơn lợi ích về lãnh thổ và các nguồn tài nguyên, đã bị từ bỏ. Nó cũng có thể cho phép Trung Quốc có thêm thời gian để sau đó bắt đầu một cuộc đối thoại trên toàn khu vực về việc đưa ra các hạn chế khó chịu, các hoạt động đe dọa trong vùng đặc quyền kinh tế của các lực lượng hải quân nước ngoài, dưới vỏ bọc tự do đi lại.

Sourabh Gupta là nhà nghiên cứu cao cấp tại Samuels International Associates [3], Washington DC, và là thành viên xuất sắc của Diễn đàn Đông Á năm 2012.

—-ABS

About Văn Ngọc Thành

Dạy học nên phải học
This entry was posted in Archives, Articles, International relations and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Gửi phản hồi

Mời bạn điền thông tin vào ô dưới đây hoặc kích vào một biểu tượng để đăng nhập:

WordPress.com Logo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản WordPress.com Log Out / Thay đổi )

Twitter picture

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Twitter Log Out / Thay đổi )

Facebook photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Facebook Log Out / Thay đổi )

Google+ photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Google+ Log Out / Thay đổi )

Connecting to %s