China’s “U-shaped Line” in the South China Sea (Đường chữ U của Trung Quốc ở biển Đông: phân tích bốn cách diễn giải)

By Duong Danh Huy

asiasentinel.com – WED,19 SEPTEMBER 2012

China’s four possible positions

China’s claims to the disputed islands in the South China Sea and their inclusion on a map that depicts a U-shaped line that comes perilously close to the coastal waters of the countries that abut the sea, have given rise to concern and debate about the line’s meaning. At stake are billions of dollars in fishing and mineral rights that all of the parties to the debate each claim as their own.

Although the dispute over the Paracels started as long ago as 1909 between China and colonial Vietnam, then represented by France, and that over the Spratlys started in the 1930s between France and Japan, the arguments over the maritime space beyond 12 nautical miles from these islands are relatively recent.

In the 1960s Indonesia and Malaysia began to make claims to the continental shelf in the southern part of the South China Sea and in 1969 the two countries signed a demarcation agreement. In 1971 the then Republic of Vietnam, i.e., South Vietnam, declared a continental shelf claim that overlapped with those of Malaysia and Indonesia.

China — that is, the pre-1949 Kuomintang government — advanced a claim to the Spratlys from the end of the Second World War, and published a map in 1948 showing the now-well-known U-shaped line. Although the area inside that line overlaps the continental shelf claims of Indonesia, Malaysia and South Vietnam, neither the People’s Republic of China in Beijing nor the Nationalists now camped in Taipei objected to these claims, nor to the 1969 Indonesia-Malaysia agreement, nor did they advance any claims of their own.

In the 1990s, however, the government in Beijing started to protest against Vietnam’s oil and gas activities in the Nam Con Son and Vanguard Bank areas, and in 1992 it awarded an area of 25,000 sq km in the Vanguard Bank area to a US company. Since then, China’s words and actions in claiming maritime space far beyond 12 nautical miles from the disputed islands have been increasingly assertive.

In this context, China’s inclusion of a map that depicts the U-shaped line in unsigned diplomatic notes sent to the Commission on The Limit of the Continental Shelf in 2009, without explanation of the line’s meaning, has given rise to much discussion. Experts and diplomats ponder what China intends to claim inside that line and how China might use that line to support its claims.

Four potential meanings of the U-shaped line have been advanced and will be considered here.

Interpretations:

  1. China’s Foreign Ministry has stated that China claims the islands inside the U-shaped line. By international law, this would include the 12-nautical-mile territorial sea and any EXCLUSIVE ZONE and continental shelf that these islands generate. If this is all what China is claiming, with no implication that this line represents a claim to rights over maritime space right up to it, then this would be the most reasonable and legally valid interpretation of the U-shaped line. If the U-shaped line represents such claims, it is no more controversial than the claims to islands by other states. However, China has not stated that this is all what the U-shaped line represents.
  2. The government of the Republic of China (i.e., the Taiwan authorities), which is not recognized as a sovereign state, has described the area inside the U-shaped line as historical waters. This view is shared by some mainland scholars. However, international law has never recognized claims of historical waters that extend so far out to sea and cover such a vast area. In any case, there is no evidence that China has historically exercised sovereignty over the area enclosed by the U-shaped line. Therefore the interpretation of the area inside the U-shaped line as historical waters is overwhelmingly rejected by international law and evidence. Furthermore, given that historical waters are normally enclosed by baselines rather than lie outside them, such interpretation would be inconsistent with baseline declarations made by the PRC.
  3. China’s diplomatic note to the CLCS in 2009 in relation to Vietnam and Malaysia’s unilateral and joint CLCS submissions claim sovereignty over the “adjacent waters” of the islands in the South China Sea and sovereign rights and jurisdiction over “relevant waters as well as the seabed and subsoil thereof”, referring to a map on which the U-shaped line is depicted, but without declaring that this line demarcates any of these areas. In 2011, China submitted a further asserting that “China’s Nansha Islands is fully entitled to Territorial Sea, Exclusive Economic Zones and Continental Shelf”. These notes seem to support a third interpretation: that China intends to claim the area inside the U-shaped line as an exclusive zone and continental shelf generated by the disputed Paracels, Spratlys and Scarborough Reef. However, while this is a possible speculation, there has been no official statement from China to confirm it. Further, given that the U-shaped line for the most part lies closer to undisputed territories than to the disputed Paracels, Spratlys and Scarborough Reef, it would be impossible for China to justify it as a boundary for the exclusive zone and continental shelf generated by these features.
  4. Since China is not ready to settle for the first interpretation, and since the second and third are clearly indefensible under international law, in recent years Chinese scholars have advanced a fourth interpretation. According to this interpretation, China’s claims in the South China Sea are composed of three layers. In the first, China claims the disputed islands. In the second, it claims the exclusive zone and continental shelf generated by those islands, which might not extend as far as the U-shaped line. In the third layer, China claims “historic rights” over maritime space beyond 12 nautical miles from the islands, with the U-shaped line being either the limit or both the basis and the limit for this claim.

Historic rights derived from the U-shaped line?
The second and fourth interpretations differ in this respect: in the latter interpretation, the proponents do not claim that the “historic rights” in the third layer mean historic sovereignty, or that the area enclosed by the U-shaped line is historic waters. Instead, the proponents of this interpretation suggest that these “historic rights” are not absolute or exclusive, but entail the right to a share, perhaps even a preferential one, of the resources right up to the U-shaped line, even where the exclusive zone and continental shelf of the disputed islands fall short of this line.

By taking a step back from claiming historical water status and absolute sovereignty for the entire area enclosed by the U-shaped line, the proponents of the fourth interpretation appear to hope to avoid the indefensibility of the second interpretation, while allowing China to claim a share to the resources right up to the U-shaped line, something that would not be possible with the first interpretation.

For this fourth interpretation, i.e., the “historic rights” argument, to be valid, two conditions must be satisfied. First, China must have legally acquired historic rights over the maritime space beyond 12 nautical miles from the disputed features prior to the existence of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Second, these historic rights must be of the types that are preserved by that convention.

Although the U-shaped line first appeared on its official maps in 1948, China has never declared that that line represents a claim to rights over maritime space for the area enclosed. In recent years, Beijing has studiously ignored calls on it to “clarify its claim.”

To date, therefore, the U-shaped line remains a line on the map with unspecified meaning and has never been officially advanced as a claim to rights over maritime space for the area enclosed. No rights over maritime space for the area enclosed, whether pre-UNCLOS or not, can be derived from a line that has never become a claim to such rights.

Even if, hypothetically, in 1948 China had declared that the U-shaped line represented a claim to rights over maritime space, that line lies too far from the disputed islands to be a legitimate claim to rights over maritime space under the law of the sea at that time. That line, therefore, could never have become a legitimate claim over maritime space, and it has never been recognized as such by any country.

What about other sources of historic rights?
If not the U-shaped line, then, can traditional fishing activities by Chinese fishermen be the basis for claims to historic rights over maritime space? It should be note that Chinese fishermen were by no means the only fishermen who traditionally fished in the South China Sea. Therefore, even if some historic rights could be derived from traditional fishing activities, China would not have a monopoly of these rights.

Additionally, in a case concerning the continental shelf of Libya and Tunisia, the International Court of Justice ruled that historic rights derived from traditional fishing activities stemmed from a legal regime distinct from that of the continental shelf and were not relevant. Therefore, while traditional fishing activities by the peoples around the South China Sea might give rise to a common fishing area through a political settlement, they do not provide the basis for claims against the continental shelf.

Can any other declarations or actions by China be the legal basis for claims to historic rights over maritime space? In practice, when Indonesia and Malaysia made claims to the continental shelf in the southern part of the South China Sea in the 1960s, when they signed a demarcation agreement in 1969, and when South Vietnam made a claim in this area in 1971, China did not protest these actions. It was not until the 1990s that China made its own claim to the continental shelf in this area. Therefore, in the southern part of the South China Sea, if anything, Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam have pre-UNCLOS rights over the continental shelf beyond 12 nautical miles from the disputed islands, while China does not.

The most legally valid interpretation
Therefore, while it is true that some rights that a country acquired prior to UNCLOS over the maritime space between 12 and 200 nautical miles from its territory might affect the post-UNCLOS delimitation of areas of overlapping entitlements, this consideration is moot because it is highly questionable that China ever acquired such rights in the first place.

In conclusion, none of the three interpretations of the U-shape line as the basis or limit to claims to rights over the entire maritime space enclosed by it, namely, as a claim to historical waters, a claim to the exclusive zone and continental shelf, or a claim to historic rights over resources, has sufficient legal basis. The most legally valid and reasonable interpretation of the U-shaped line remains that of a claim only to the islands within that line.

The basis and extent of any subsequent claim to rights over maritime space should then be derived from the islands using UNCLOS and the international courts’ past rulings on maritime delimitation, and not from the U-shaped line.

(Duong Danh Huy is a physicist and resident of the United Kingdom whose whose avocation is international maritime law.)

—- Source:http://www.asiasentinel.com/politics/chinas-u-shaped-line-in-the-south-china-sea/

—BẢN DỊCH CỦA Phạm Thanh Vân, Phan Văn Song

Đường chữ U của Trung Quốc ở biển Đông: phân tích bốn cách diễn giải

Thứ năm, 04 Tháng 10 2012 15:26

Việc Trung Quốc yêu sách vùng biển nằm ngoài 12 hải lý tính từ các các đảo tranh chấp ở biển Đông kể từ những năm 1990 và việc họ kèm một bản đồ vẽ đường chữ U trong các công hàm gửi đến Uỷ ban Ranh giới Thềm lục địa (CLCS) năm 2009 đã làm dấy lên nhiều quan ngại và tranh luận về ý nghĩa của đường này. Bài viết này xem xét một số cách diễn giải có thể có trong bối cảnh Bắc Kinh chưa có một sự giải thích rõ ràng.

Bối cảnh

Tranh chấp quần đảo Hoàng Sa bắt đầu vào năm 1909 giữa Trung Quốc và Việt Nam, lúc đó do Pháp đại diện, và tranh chấp quần đảo Trường Sa bắt đầu trong thập niên 1930 giữa Pháp và Nhật Bản. Sau Chiến tranh thế giới thứ hai, Trung Quốc mới đề ra yêu sách chủ quyền đối với quần đảo Trường Sa. Vào năm 1948 Trung Quốc phát hành một bản đồ với đường chữ U, nhưng lúc đó họ không nói đường đó là yêu sách về vùng biển bên trong đường này.

Tranh chấp đối với vùng biển nằm ngoài 12 hải lý tính từ các quần đảo này chỉ mới bắt đầu khá gần đây.

Trong thập niên 1960, Indonesia và Malaysia bắt đầu đưa ra các tuyên bố chủ quyền đối với thềm lục địa ở phần phía nam biển Đông, và vào năm 1969 hai nước này đã ký kết hiệp định phân giới. Năm 1971 Việt Nam Cộng Hòa đưa ra yêu sách thềm lục địa có chồng lấn với các yêu sách của Malaysia và Indonesia.

Mặc dù khu vực bên trong đường chữ U chồng lấn với các yêu sách thềm lục địa của Indonesia, Malaysia và Việt Nam Cộng Hòa, cả Cộng hòa Nhân dân Trung Hoa ở Bắc Kinh lẫn Quốc Dân Đảng ở Đài Bắc đều không phản đối các yêu sách này, không phản đối hiệp ước năm 1969 của Indonesia-Malaysia, và lúc đó họ cũng không đưa ra yêu sách gì về vùng thềm lục địa đó.

Phải tới thập niên 1990, Bắc Kinh mới bắt đầu phản đối các hoạt động dầu khí của Việt Nam ở khu vực Nam Côn Sơn và khu vực bãi Tư Chính (Vanguard Bank), và vào năm 1992 họ ký hợp đồng khảo sát với một công ty Mỹ cho một khu vực rộng 25.000 km² trong vùng bãi Tư Chính. Kể từ đó, các tuyên bố và hành động của Trung Quốc trong việc đòi hỏi vùng biển nằm ngoài 12 hải lý tính từ các đảo tranh chấp ngày càng thêm quyết đoán.

Trong bối cảnh này, việc Trung Quốc kèm bản đồ có vẽ đường chữ U trong các công hàm gửi cho CLCS năm 2009, mà không có lời giải thích nào về ý nghĩa của đường này, đã làm dấy lên rất nhiều tranh luận. Các chuyên gia và các nhà ngoại giao phỏng đoán về Trung Quốc có ý định yêu sách gì bên trong đường đó, và về Trung Quốc có thể sử dụng đường đó thế nào để biện minh cho yêu sách của mình.

Có bốn cách hiểu về đường chữ U đã được đưa ra và sẽ được xem xét ở đây.

Các cách diễn giải đường chữ U

1. Bộ Ngoại giao Trung Quốc đã tuyên bố rằng Trung Quốc đòi hỏi chủ quyền đối với các đảo bên trong đường chữ U. Theo luật quốc tế, yêu sách đó sẽ bao gồm thêm lãnh hải 12 hải lý và vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa, nếu có, của các đảo này.

Nếu đó là tất cả những gì Trung Quốc đòi hỏi, tức là Trung Quốc không đòi hỏi quyền hạn gì đối với toàn bộ vùng biển bên trong đường chữ U, thì đó sẽ là cách diễn giải đường chữ U ít phi lý và ít phi pháp nhất. Tất nhiên sẽ còn phải xét xem việc Trung Quốc đòi các đảo là có hợp pháp hay không, nhưng nếu đường chữ U chỉ có nghĩa đòi đảo thì nó sẽ chỉ tương đương với việc các nước khác đòi đảo. Tuy nhiên, vấn đề là Trung Quốc không nói đó là tất cả ý nghĩa của đường chữ U.

2. Chính phủ Trung Hoa Dân quốc (tức là nhà chức trách Đài Loan – một chính phủ không được công nhận là đại diện cho quốc gia nào) đã tuyên bố rằng khu vực bên trong đường chữ U là vùng nước lịch sử. Quan điểm này được một số học giả đại lục chia sẻ.

Tuy nhiên, luật quốc tế chưa từng công nhận đòi hỏi nào về các vùng nước lịch sử mà vươn quá xa ra biển và bao gồm một khu vực rộng lớn như vậy. Ngoài ra, không có bằng chứng cho thấy trong lịch sử Trung Quốc đã thực thi chủ quyền trên khu vực được bao bọc bởi đường chữ U. Vì vậy cách giải thích vùng biển bên trong đường chữ U như là vùng nước lịch sử bị luật pháp quốc tế và bằng chứng bác bỏ hoàn toàn. Hơn nữa, vì vùng nước lịch sử thường được bao bọc bên trong đường cơ sở chứ không nằm bên ngoài, việc đòi vùng biên bên trong đường chữ U sẽ không phù hợp với tuyên bố về đường cơ sở do Cộng hòa Nhân dân Trung Hoa đưa ra.

3. Các công hàm của Trung Quốc gửi cho CLCS năm 2009, liên quan đến các đệ trình riêng và chung của Việt Nam và Malaysia, đòi chủ quyền đối với các “vùng nước liền kề” các đảo trong biển Đông và quyền chủ quyền và quyền tài phán đối với “các vùng nước liên quan cũng như đáy biển và lòng đất dưới đáy của chúng”, có đính kèm một bản đồ có vẽ đường chữ U. Nhưng các công hàm này không hề tuyên bố rằng đường này là ranh giới của bất kỳ vùng nước nào. Năm 2011, Trung Quốc gửi CLCS thêm một công hàm khẳng định rằng “quần đảo Nam Sa của Trung Quốc được hưởng đầy đủ lãnh hải, vùng đặc quyền kinh tế (EEZ) và thềm lục địa”. Các công hàm này dường như ủng hộ một cách diễn giải thứ ba: Trung Quốc có ý định đòi hỏi vùng biển bên trong đường chữ U như là vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa phát sinh từ quần đảo Hoàng Sa, quần đảo Trường Sa và bãi cạn Scarborough.

Tuy nhiên, đây chỉ là một suy đoán; không có bất kỳ tuyên bố chính thức nào của Trung Quốc xác nhận suy đoán đó. Hơn nữa, với thực tế rằng hầu hết các phần của đường chữ U đều nằm gần các vùng lãnh thổ không có tranh chấp hơn là quần đảo Hoàng Sa, quần đảo Trường Sa và bãi cạn Scarborough, Trung Quốc sẽ khó có thể biện minh đường này như là một ranh giới cho vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa phát sinh từ các cấu trúc địa lý này.

4. Vì Trung Quốc chưa sẵn sàng chấp nhận cách diễn giải thứ nhất, và vì cách diễn giải thứ hai và thứ ba rõ ràng là không phù hợp với luật quốc tế, trong những năm gần đây các học giả Trung Quốc đã đưa ra một cách diễn giải thứ tư. Theo cách diễn giải này, yêu sách của Trung Quốc ở biển Đông bao gồm ba lớp. Ở lớp đầu tiên, Trung Quốc đòi chủ quyền đối với các đảo đang bị tranh chấp. Ở lớp thứ hai, họ yêu sách vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa phát sinh từ các đảo này. Vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa này có thể không vươn ra đến đường chữ U. Ở lớp thứ ba, Trung Quốc đòi “quyền lịch sử” đối với vùng biển bên ngoài 12 hải lý tính từ các đảo, với đường chữ U là phạm vi, hoặc vừa là cơ sở vừa là phạm vi, cho yêu sách này.

Đường chữ U có thể tạo ra quyền lịch sử?

Hai cách diễn giải thứ nhì và thứ tư khác nhau ở điểm: trong cách diễn giải thứ tư, những người đề xuất không đòi hỏi rằng “quyền lịch sử” trong lớp yêu sách thứ ba phải có nghĩa là chủ quyền lịch sử, hay khu vực bao bởi đường chữ U phải là vùng nước lịch sử. Thay vào đó, những người đề xuất cách diễn giải thứ tư đề nghị rằng các “quyền lịch sử này” không có nghĩa là tuyệt đối hay độc quyền, mà chỉ là quyền được chia sẻ, thậm chí có thể là được ưu tiên trong việc chia sẻ, tài nguyên cho tới sát đường chữ U, dù cho vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa của những đảo đang trong tình trạng tranh chấp không vươn ra tới đường này.

Bằng cách lùi một bước và không yêu sách vùng nước lịch sử và chủ quyền tuyệt đối cho toàn bộ khu vực bên trong đường chữ U, có lẽ những người đề xuất cách diễn giải thứ tư hy vọng tránh được tính phi pháp của cách diễn giải thứ nhì, trong khi đó vẫn có cớ để Trung Quốc yêu sách việc chia sẻ tài nguyên tới sát đường chữ U, điều mà họ không thể làm được với cách diễn giải thứ nhất.

Muốn cho cách diễn giải thứ tư, tức là lập luận “quyền lịch sử”, có thể hợp lý, cần phải thỏa mãn hai điều kiện. Thứ nhất, từ trước khi Công ước Luật Biển (UNCLOS) ra đời Trung Quốc phải đã đạt được quyền lịch sử hợp pháp trên vùng biển nằm ngoài khu vực 12 hải lý của các đảo đang trong tình trạng tranh chấp. Thứ nhì, những quyền lịch sử này phải là những quyền được công nhận bởi công ước đó.

Mặc dù đường chữ U xuất hiện lần đầu tiên trên bản đồ chính thức của Trung Quốc từ năm 1948, Trung Quốc chưa bao giờ tuyên bố rằng đường đó thể hiện một yêu sách về quyền hạn trên biển bên trong đường đó. Thậm chí, trong những năm gần đây, Bắc Kinh đã cố ý lờ đi những lời yêu cầu làm rõ về ý nghĩa của đường chữ U này.

Vì vậy, cho tới nay đường chữ U vẫn chỉ là một đường trên bản đồ chưa hề có ý nghĩa, và chưa bao giờ được chính thức đưa ra như là một yêu sách về quyền hạn đối với vùng biển phía bên trong nó. Vì đường chữ U chưa bao giờ được tuyên bố là yêu sách cho những quyền hạn nào đó đối với vùng biển bên trong nó, nó không thể là cơ sở pháp lý cho những quyền hạn đó.

Giả sử vào năm 1948 Trung Quốc có tuyên bố rằng đường chữ U là một yêu sách về các quyền trên biển đi nữa, thì theo luật quốc tế vào thời điểm đó, đường đó cũng nằm cách quá xa với các đảo có tranh chấp để được coi là một yêu sách hợp pháp. Vì vậy, đường chữ U đã không bao giờ có thể trở thành một yêu sách hợp pháp về quyền trên biển, và nó chưa bao giờ được công nhận như vậy bởi bất kỳ quốc gia nào.

Liệu có thể có nguồn nào khác là cơ sở cho quyền lịch sử?

Nếu không phải là đường chữ U thì liệu những hoạt động đánh cá truyền thống bởi ngư dân Trung Quốc có thể được coi là cơ sở cho yêu sách về quyền lịch sử trên biển được không?

Cần lưu ý rằng Trung Quốc chắc chắn không thể nào là nước duy nhất có ngư dân đánh cá lâu đời trên biển Đông. Bởi vậy, giả sử việc đánh cá truyền thống có tạo ra những quyền lịch sử nào đó, thì Trung Quốc cũng không phải là nước duy nhất có những quyền này.

Thêm nữa, trong vụ phân xử về thềm lục địa giữa hai nước Libya và Tunisia, Tòa án Công lý Quốc tế đã phán quyết rằng những quyền lịch sử do các hoạt động đánh cá truyền thống là xuất phát từ một cơ chế pháp lý hoàn toàn khác với và không liên quan tới thềm lục địa. Bởi vậy giả sử những hoạt động đánh cá truyền thống trên Biển Đông có thể là lý do để các nước liên quan thỏa thuận tạo ra một khu vực đánh cá chung đi nữa, thì nó cũng không thể tạo ra cơ sở cho những yêu sách đối với thềm lục địa.

Liệu những tuyên bố hay hành động khác của Trung Quốc có thể được coi là cơ sở pháp lý cho yêu sách về quyền lịch sử trên biển không?

Trên thực tế, khi Indonesia và Malaysia đưa ra yêu sách về thềm lục địa ở phía Nam Biển Đông vào thập niên 60, khi hai quốc gia này ký thỏa thuận phân ranh giới vào năm 1969, và khi Việt Nam Cộng Hòa đưa ra yêu sách đối với khu vực này vào năm 1971, Trung Quốc đã không hề phản đối. Phải đến tận thập niên 1990 Trung Quốc mới bắt đầu đưa ra yêu sách về thềm lục địa trong khu vực này. Vì vậy, ở phía Nam của Biển Đông, nếu như có bất cứ quyền lịch sử gì đối với thềm lục địa phía ngoài 12 hải lý tính từ các quần đảo có tranh chấp, thì Indonesia, Malaysia và Việt Nam là những nước có những quyền lịch sử đó chứ không phải Trung Quốc.

Cách diễn giải ít phi pháp nhất

Vì vậy, trong khi có thể tồn tại một số quyền hạn mà một quốc gia đạt được trong thời kỳ tiền UNCLOS trên vùng biển nằm giữa 12 và 200 hải lý có thể ảnh hưởng tới sự phân định ranh giới các khu vực có các quyền lợi đối kháng nhau trong thời kỳ hậu UNCLOS, điều đó cũng không biện minh được cho đường lưỡi bò, vì Trung Quốc đã không hề đạt được những quyền đó.

Kết luận lại, trong ba cách diễn giải về đường chữ U như cơ sở hay giới hạn của những yêu sách đối với toàn bộ vùng biển trong nó (bao gồm yêu sách về vùng nước lịch sử, yêu sách về vùng đặc quyền kinh tế và thềm lục địa, hay là yêu sách về quyền lịch sử đối với các nguồn tài nguyên), không có cách diễn giải nào có đủ cơ sở pháp lý.

Cách diễn giải ít phi pháp nhất cho đường chữ U là đó chỉ là một yêu sách đối với các quần đảo bên trong đường đó. Tất nhiên dù cách diễn giải thứ nhất là ít phi pháp nhất thì cơ sở pháp lý của nó cũng vẫn yếu hơn cơ sở pháp lý của Việt Nam về chủ quyền đối với Hoàng Sa, Trường Sa, nhưng đó là một đề tài khác. Vấn đề ở đây là cơ sở và phạm vi của bất kỳ yêu sách nào về quyền trên biển cần phải được bắt nguồn từ các quần đảo dựa theo UNCLOS và các phán quyết trước đó của tòa án về phân định biển, chứ không phải từ đường chữ U.

TS. Dương Danh Huy (bài tiếng Anh đăng trên Asia Sentinel)

Phạm Thanh Vân, Phan Văn Song (dịch)

—–

Nguồn: http://nghiencuubiendong.vn/nghien-cuu-vietnam/2980-duong-chu-u-cua-trung-quoc-o-bien-dong-phan-tich-bon-cach-dien-giai

About Văn Ngọc Thành

Dạy học nên phải học
This entry was posted in Archives, Articles, International relations, Teaching and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Gửi phản hồi

Mời bạn điền thông tin vào ô dưới đây hoặc kích vào một biểu tượng để đăng nhập:

WordPress.com Logo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản WordPress.com Log Out / Thay đổi )

Twitter picture

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Twitter Log Out / Thay đổi )

Facebook photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Facebook Log Out / Thay đổi )

Google+ photo

Bạn đang bình luận bằng tài khoản Google+ Log Out / Thay đổi )

Connecting to %s